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Court of Federal Claims Rejects Unsupported Decision to Cancel Solicitation – SmallGovCon

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An agency ordinarily enjoys very broad discretion in its procurement-related decisions. This includes whether an agency will award a contract or, instead, cancel a procurement. Broad as this discretion is, however, an agency does not have carte blanche authority to cancel a procurement on a whim. As a recent Court of Federal Claims decision shows, an agency must support its decision with sufficient information, lest the cancellation decision itself be successfully protested.

Source: Court of Federal Claims Rejects Unsupported Decision to Cancel Solicitation – SmallGovCon

New Rule Changes Bring CBCA Procedures Into the Efiling Age – SmallGovCon

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On August 17, 2018, the Civilian Board of Contract Appeals (CBCA) issued new procedural rules which go into effect Monday, September 17, 2018. The substantial overhaul of the former rules intends to bring the CBCA into the 21st century by emphasizing, adding, and clarifying rules about electronic filing.

Source: New Rule Changes Bring CBCA Procedures Into the Efiling Age – SmallGovCon

Where Non-Price Ratings Identical, Agency Wasn’t Required to Choose Lower-Priced Offeror – SmallGovCon

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In a best value competition, when two offerors receive identical adjectival scores on the non-price factors, one might assume that the procuring agency would be required to award the contract to the lower-priced offeror.

Not so.  In a recent bid protest decision, the GAO held that where two offerors received identical scores on three non-price factors, the agency could still elect to award the contract to the higher-priced offeror.

Source: Where Non-Price Ratings Identical, Agency Wasn’t Required to Choose Lower-Priced Offeror – SmallGovCon

SBA OIG Recommends Improved Oversight of 8(a) Continuing Eligibility – SmallGovCon

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Last year, we wrote about the SBA’s Office of Inspector General’s concerns with the SBA’s review of potential 8(a) participants’ eligibility. In this report, the OIG made three recommendations aimed at improving to verify applicants’ eligibility.

Just last week, the OIG released a new report analyzing the 8(a) Program. This report picks up where the earlier report left off—it addressed several issues in the SBA’s evaluation of participants’ continuing eligibility.

Source: SBA OIG Recommends Improved Oversight of 8(a) Continuing Eligibility – SmallGovCon

Recent SBA OHA Decision Offers NAICS Code Appeal Guidance – SmallGovCon

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As we’ve noted here on SmallGovCon, appealing the assignment of a NAICS code for a solicitation is often successful. But the time frame for doing so is short, and there are other procedural limitations. Given the short deadlines and procedural hurdles, are there any signals to help identify when a NAICS code appeal might be in order?

Recently, SBA’s Office of Hearings and Appeals provided some guidelines in discussing the assignment of NAICS codes in the Computer Facilities Management Services, Research and Development, and Engineering Services codes.

Source: Recent SBA OHA Decision Offers NAICS Code Appeal Guidance – SmallGovCon

Don’t Overlook the Seemingly Perfunctory in Your Proposal: CAGE Codes – SmallGovCon

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As our readers well know, a good proposal for a federal government procurement is an exercise in persuasive writing. You muster your creative powers to convince the source selection authority that you offer the best product or service, that your price is competitive, and that your past performance is stellar. So you invest heavily in your proposal writers; you review your proposal repeatedly to polish and ensure that it compels; you agonize.

Source: Don’t Overlook the Seemingly Perfunctory in Your Proposal: CAGE Codes – SmallGovCon

GAO: Protest Sustained Where Agency Improperly Applied Adjectival Ratings – SmallGovCon

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Recently, GAO sustained a bid protest where the ratings assigned to the unsuccessful offeror’s proposal did not conform to the definitions identified within the Solicitation. For those of you frequent the blog, you may recall earlier this year when we blogged on GAO’s decision in Immersion Consulting, LLC, B-415155 et al. (Dec. 4, 2017) where the Source Selection Authority had unilaterally revised the Source Selection Evaluation Board’s evaluation prior to making an award decision. GAO sustained the protest and instructed the agency to reevaluate proposals. This same procurement was subject to another round of protests following the agency’s reevaluation.

Source: GAO: Protest Sustained Where Agency Improperly Applied Adjectival Ratings – SmallGovCon

5 Things You Should Know: Size Protests and Appeals – SmallGovCon

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I’m just back from El Paso, where I had a great time discussing small business size and affiliation issues at the Contract Opportunities Center. This presentation got me thinking: “Wouldn’t our loyal SmallGovCon readers want to know 5 Things about size protests and appeals?”

Source: 5 Things You Should Know: Size Protests and Appeals – SmallGovCon

CO Identifies Wrong Appeals Board, Appeal Dismissed Anyway – SmallGovCon

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An Air Force Contracting Officer, asked by a contractor where to send an appeal, provided the contractor with information about the Civilian Board of Contract Appeals, not the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals.

Despite the Contracting Officer’s erroneous advice, the CBCA dismissed the appeal for lack of jurisdiction.

Source: CO Identifies Wrong Appeals Board, Appeal Dismissed Anyway – SmallGovCon

Yes, An Agency Can Change the NAICS Code from One Iteration of a Contract to the Next – SmallGovCon

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As the incumbent contractor, you’re excited to bid on the successor contract. The day it’s posted, you dash to fbo.gov, pull up the solicitation, and breathe a sigh of relief: the contract is still exclusively a small business set-aside. But wait! Under the assigned NAICS code your business doesn’t fall below the size standard. Can the agency change the NAICS code from one iteration of the contract to another? Sure, so long as the selected NAICS code meets the regulatory standard.

Source: Yes, An Agency Can Change the NAICS Code from One Iteration of a Contract to the Next – SmallGovCon

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