Defense Contractor That Posed As Small Business Forfeits $7.8 Million – Contracting – GovExec.com

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A company that rents tents and other outdoor structures for events agreed to pay the government $7.8 million to settle charges that it wrongly won Defense Department set-aside contracts reserved for small businesses.

Source: Defense Contractor That Posed As Small Business Forfeits $7.8 Million – Contracting – GovExec.com

Contractors lose out when agreements aren’t properly crafted

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Sometimes agency professionals, such as the people who write contracts, fail at the basics. For example, take including all of the elements that need to be in a contract. Even so, it’s often the hapless contractor that loses out. Procurement attorney Joe Petrillo, of Petrillo and Powell, joined Federal Drive with Tom Temin to discuss a recent case in point.

Source: Contractors lose out when agreements aren’t properly crafted

DHS contractors face protests – on the streets — FCW

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Tech companies are facing protests internally from workers and externally from activists about doing for government amid controversial policies like ‘zero tolerance’ for illegal immigration.

Source: DHS contractors face protests – on the streets — FCW

The “Red Book” – GAO’s Principles of Federal Appropriations Law

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PNWC's Government Contracting Update

Researching Federal Contract law is not easy and is usually left to the professionals. Contract disputes are complicated as well because the law and the regulations that were in effect when the contract was created govern its applications. This means going through many books, current and superseded.

Source: PNWC’s Government Contracting Update: The “Red Book” – GAO’s Principles of Federal Appropriations Law

What Happens When the Contracting Officer Disagrees with the Contract Auditor?

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PNWC's Government Contracting Update

Contract auditors perform audits and issue reports, sometimes with recommendations or questioned costs, to the contracting officer. The contracting officer, in turn, resolves the audit findings with the contractor. Sometimes, the contracting officer does not agree with the audit findings; more so if the audit relates to pricing proposals than with historical costs. Why? When it comes to pricing proposals, everyone’s dealing with estimates of future costs and judgement becomes a big part of estimating. Incurred cost on the other hand deal with historical evidence supporting the incurrence of costs. Contractors either have support or they don’t. Judgement is not a major factor on the allowability of costs.

Source: PNWC’s Government Contracting Update: What Happens When the Contracting Officer Disagrees with the Contract Auditor?

What to do in Q1 FY19 – Federal News Network

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This week on Amtower Off Center, host Mark Amtower interviews Lou Anne Brossman of Government Marketing University and Rita Walston of the immixGroup  on topics germane to GovCon marketing professionals, including two upcoming events.

Topics include:

Source: What to do in Q1 FY19 – Federal News Network

How powerful is diversity in the government market? — Washington Technology

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Back in the olden days when Washington Technology was a print magazine published 24 times a year, our art department had an expression for the photos that accompanied our articles: MAWGs.

It was an acronym for “Middle Aged White Guys” because so many of the photos were of, well, middle-aged white men. We saw the same thing at our events – a sea of men wearing dark suits.

Source: How powerful is diversity in the government market? — Washington Technology

Get Your Novation Before Filing a Bid Protest with GAO – SmallGovCon

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Only an “interested party” can bring a GAO bid protest. This generally means that a protester must be “an actual or prospective bidder or offeror” with a “direct economic interest” in the contract’s award.

Source: Get Your Novation Before Filing a Bid Protest with GAO – SmallGovCon

HUBzone’s beware the too good to be true offer — Washington Technology

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I’m sure you’re familiar with the adage, “If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.”

For owners of HUBZone businesses—small businesses that operate and employ people in Historically Underutilized Business Zones (HUBZones)—it’s a motto to keep in mind as they travel to one of the largest HUBZone matchmaking events in the country this October, the National HUBZone Conference in Chantilly, Virginia.

Source: HUBzone’s beware the too good to be true offer — Washington Technology

ASBCA: Claim Must Include Request for “Final Decision” – SmallGovCon

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As readers of this blog might know, the government contracts claims process is set by statute and includes a number of requirements, such as being certified if the dollar amount is over $100,000.

But a possibly lesser-known requirement is that, in order to be valid, a claim must request that the contracting officer issue a “final decision” on the claim. In a recent decision, the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals opined on this requirement.

Source: ASBCA: Claim Must Include Request for “Final Decision” – SmallGovCon

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